The Texas Border Economies Are Back

Back in 1994-1995, the Texas border economies of Brownsville, El Paso, Laredo, and McAllen were concerned about how the Mexican Tequila crisis, when the Mexican economy plunged by 6.2 percent, would impact growth prospects. The dependency of the border economies on the fate of their southern neighbor, while strong over the long history of both countries, had intensified during the period that started … Back in 1994-1995, the Texas border economies of Brownsville, El Paso, Laredo, and McAllen were concerned about how the Mexican Tequila crisis, when the Mexican economy plunged by 6.2 percent, would impact growth prospects. The dependency of the border economies on the fate of their southern neighbor, while strong over the long history of both countries, had intensified during the period that started in the 1960s and culminated with the signing of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) on January 1, 1994, between the United States, Canada, and Mexico. Thank you for your interest in Wells Fargo’s Economic Commentary by email. You are receiving this message because you have requested Economic Commentary information and updates sent via email. If you no longer wish to receive these emails, please click on the following link to access the Economic Commentary by email registration page: http://www.wellsfargo.com/economicsemail.

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